information, Travel

Discover Greece: Ultimate Guide to Visas, Getting Around, Safety and Local laws.


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Notorious for its dated and archaic classical Greek architecture, Greece is also prominent for yielding Olive Oil, Honey and Mastiha Chios- something I didn’t even know and learned as I typed out this very blog post. Like me, there are things people still don’t know about this little European country, and questions don’t come quicker than when you plan to take a little trip there yourself. Below are some useful answers to some much asked questions, which helped me before I headed out to visit the country myself. Feel free to add any other tips from your trip in the comments below!

Sea Routes

The Greek islands are a grouped in clusters, surrounded by both land and sea. To the east of the mainland is the Aegean Sea, to the south is the Mediterranean Sea and to the west is the Ionian Sea. For this reason, plenty of ports are available and a great many shipping companies provide their services to get in and around the country with a modern and luxurious fleet. All the islands are linked to the mainland with regular service, so island-hopping is a definite option during your vacation!

Check out timetable for ferries for Greece or the Greek islands here.

Passports and Visas

Greece is still a very active member-state of the European Union and consented to the Schengen Agreement  back in 1992. The agreement abolishes many of the EU’s internal borders, facilitating passport-free movement throughout the bloc. This means that citizens from EU countries can move around Greece with just their passport, or a police issued I.D card that is easily obtained with the help of respective embassies, consulates or even travel agencies. Visas are not required by citizens of countries within the Schengen Agreement and the following is a list, correct as of January 2015:

Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France and Monaco, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland.

Citizens from these EU countries that are not apart of the Schengen agreement may also visit Greece without a visa:

Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Ireland, Romania and United Kingdom.

So if you’re like me and hold a British passport, you do not need a visa to enter Greece. As a British passport holder, you can stay as a visitor for 3 months. For longer stays, you will need to apply for a residence permit.

Getting Around

Getting to/from the Athens International Airport and the city center, located about 20 km (12 miles) east can be achieved via:

  • Metro: 

Metro Line 3 connects the Athens airport with the city centre. Trains run every 30 minutes, 7 days a week from 6:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. The trip from/to the Airport to Syntagma station (Athens centre) lasts 40 minutes.

  • 24-hour express buses: 

Express bus routes connect Athens (city centre & greater area) and Piraeus (port) directly with the Athens International Airport. Service is provided on a non-stop basis seven days a week including holidays (24/7 operation). Bus tickets are sold at the info/ticket-kiosk (located outside the Arrivals between Exits 4 and 5), or onboard (ask operator) at no extra cost.

There are four main routes, check them out here.

  • Proastiakos:

The Suburban railway (Proastiakos) connects the Athens airport with the Athens Central Railway Station (Larissis Station) and Acharnai Railway Centre, and through them to the National Railway network. The Suburban railway departs every 15-25 minutes from the Athens Airport railway station to Plakentias station, where you can change trains and continue to the city centre (Metro Line 3 to Egaleo), using the same ticket.

  •  Taxi: 

Taxis are available at the designated Taxi waiting area located at Exit 3 of the Arrivals Level. A taxi from the airport to the city centre (inner ring) costs a flat rate of €35 from 5:00 a.m. to midnight, and €50 from midnight to 5:00 a.m.

Note: The charge is determined by the time of arrival at the destination and includes all applicable surcharges and extras.

Health and Safety

For you to have access to necessary healthcare citizens from member-states of the EU must have the European Health Card (EHIC) or any form of legal community document issued by their competent social security agency. It’s free to acquire one in the UK and isn’t a substitute for medical and travel insurance, but entitles you to state provided medical treatment that may become urgent during your stay. Any treatment provided is on the same terms as Greek nationals. Visit your health care professional at least 3 to 6 weeks before your trip to check whether you need vaccinations or any other preventative measures. In case of any emergencies, have these following numbers close by:

Police: 100

Ambulance Service: 166

Tourist Police: 1571
SOS Doctors: 1016
Duty Hospitals and Clinics: 1434
Pharmacies: 1434
Open Line for alcohol drug Addiction: 210 3617089
Poisoning First Aid: 210 7793777

Local Laws and Customs

Greece has made it illegal to smoke in all indoor places, violating this could mean a penalty fine of up to €500.

Don’t become involved or even try to bring Class C drugs of any kind into the country. Possession of even the smallest amount will lead to arrest and could mean lengthy prison sentences- visitor or not.

Any indecent behaviour is not tolerated by the Greek, including mooning. The courts will most likely impose a heavy fine or prison sentences on people who behave indecently.

Lastly, keep any receipts of purchases you make! Arrests have been known to be made for purchasing/acquiring/handling pirate CDs and DVDs and have led to imprisonment in some cases. Keep any and all receipts! Dont say I didnt warn you.

Climate

Greece has a Mediterranean climate with ample amounts of sunshine, meek temperatures and a limited amount of rainfall. In the summer, the warmer and dryer days and cooled with seasonal winds called the Meltemi, whilst the more rocky regions have commonly lower temperatures. In the winter, mild temperatures in the lowland areas attract low amounts of snow and ice, whilst the more mountainous area is completely covered in snow.

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